June is Cataract Awareness Month

June is Cataract Awareness Month

Story Credit: Prevent Blindness America

Vision Loss from Leading Cause of Blindness Can be Restored with Proper Treatment

There are currently more than 24 million Americans age 40 and older who have cataract, according to the Vision Problems in the U.S. report from Prevent Blindness America.  It is the leading cause of blindness worldwide.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens which blocks or changes the passage of light into the eye.  Unlike many eye diseases, however, vision loss due to cataract can be restored.  Cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the United States and has a 95 percent success rate. And, a new study found that cataract surgery patients had a significantly reduced rate of hip fractures from falls.

To educate the public on cataract, Prevent Blindness America has declared June as Cataract Awareness Month.  The national non-profit group provides free information through its dedicated web page at preventblindness.org/cataract, or via phone at (800) 331-2020.  For those interested in conducting discussions or seminars on the subject, PBA offers a free online module on cataract including a PowerPoint presentation with a complete guide as part of its Healthy Eyes Educational Series

Cataract generally does not cause pain, redness or tears. However, these changes in your vision may be signs of cataract:

  • Blurred vision, double vision, ghost images, the sense of a “film” over the eyes.
  • Lights seem too dim for reading or close-up work, or you are “dazzled” by strong light.
  •  Changing eyeglass prescriptions often. The change may not seem to help your vision.
  • You may sometimes notice the cataract in your eye. It may look like a milky or yellowish spot in the pupil (the center of your eye is normally black).

“Although getting a cataract is common, it doesn’t have to mean permanent vision loss,” said Hugh R. Parry, president and CEO of Prevent Blindness America.   “One way to protect our vision is to make a commitment to take care of our eyes today, including getting a dilated eye exam, so we can help protect our sight for the future not just from cataract, but other eye diseases as well.”

For free information on cataract including Medicare coverage, please call Prevent Blindness America at (800) 331-2020 or log on to preventblindness.org/cataract.

 


About Prevent Blindness America: Founded in 1908, Prevent Blindness America is the nation’s leading volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight. Focused on promoting a continuum of vision care, Prevent Blindness America touches the lives of millions of people each year through public and professional education, advocacy, certified vision screening and training, community and patientservice programs and research. These services are made possible through the generous support of the American public. Together with a network of affiliates and regional offices, Prevent Blindness America is committed to eliminating preventable blindness in America.

 

May is Healthy Vision and Ultraviolet Awareness Month

May is Healthy Vision and Ultraviolet Awareness Month

News Release from American Academy of Ophthalmology

Taking Simple Steps Can Help Protect Your Sight

Approximately 37 million adults in America have age-related macular degeneration, cataract, diabetic retinopathy, or glaucoma, all of which can cause visual impairment or blindness, according to the National Eye Institute (NEI).[i] However, recent studies show that making healthy choices and getting regular eye exams can help reduce a person’s risk of vision loss. In support of NEI’s Healthy Vision Month in May, Vision Resource Center of America and the American Academy of Ophthalmology are encouraging everyone to take charge of their eye health and preserve their sight by following some simple tips.

 

Live a healthy lifestyle.

Eating a nutritious diet, maintaining a healthy weight and not smoking can lower your risk of eye disease. Foods that boost eye health include dark green leafy greens, cold water fish and citrus fruits. A study recently published in the journal Ophthalmology showed that a diet rich in vitamin C can cut the risk of cataract progression by nearly a third.[ii] Other research shows that smoking doubles the risk of the eye disease age-related macular degeneration, is linked to cataracts, and worsens dry eye.

 

Know your family history.

Certain eye diseases can be inherited. If you have a close relative with macular degeneration, you have a 50 percent chance of developing the condition. In addition, a family history of glaucoma increases your chances of developing the condition by four to nine times. So talk to your family members about what eye conditions they have. It can help you and your eye care professionals evaluate whether you may be at higher risk.

 

Get a dilated eye exam.

Many eye diseases may have no symptoms in their early stages. A dilated eye exam is the best way to detect eye diseases so they can be treated as soon as possible to help prevent vision loss. The Academy recommends that adults have a baseline comprehensive eye exam with an ophthalmologist – a physician specializing in medical and surgical eye care – by the time they turn 40. This is when age-related eye changes often begin to occur. People who are 65 and older should get an eye exam every one to two years. Those with chronic conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure or known eye diseases may need to go earlier and more often.

 

Wear sunglasses.

Over time, exposure to UV rays from the sun can increase your risk of cataracts, certain cancers and growths in or around the eyes. When choosing sunglasses, pick ones that block out at least 99 percent of UV rays. A wide-brimmed hat offers great additional protection as well.

 

Use protective eyewear to prevent injuries.

Roughly a third of all emergency room visits for eye-related issues stem from traumatic eye injuries, according to a recent study in the journal Ophthalmology.[iii] To help prevent these injuries, wear the right protective eyewear when doing activities that could cause eye injuries, such as home repair, garden work and sports.

“People don’t often realize that simple, everyday actions can help them preserve their vision well through their golden years,” said Rebecca J. Taylor, M.D., clinical spokesperson for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “We encourage everyone to take these steps in order to keep their eyes healthy.”

 

To learn more ways to keep your eyes healthy, visit the American Academy of Ophthalmology’s public information website at www.aao.org/eye-health.

 


About the American Academy of Ophthalmology: The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons. A global community of 32,000 medical doctors, we protect sight and empower lives by setting the standards for ophthalmic education and advocating for our patients and the public. We innovate to advance our profession and to ensure the delivery of the highest-quality eye care. Our EyeSmart® program provides the public with the most trusted information about eye health. For more information, visit www.aao.org.

[i] https://nei.nih.gov/eyedata/adultvision_usa

[ii] Genetic and Dietary Factors Influencing the Progression of Nuclear Cataract, Yonova-Doing, et al, Ophthalmology, article in press March 2016.

[iii] Eye-related Emergency Department Visits in the United States, 2010, Vaziri, et al. Ophthalmology, April 2016.

 

VRC Fund Raiser Golf Tournament

NEW DATE!
Wednesday, August 19, 2020
Willow Hollow Golf Course
619 Prison Road, Leesport, PA 19533


Get your group together for an afternoon on the links to help support Vision Resource Center of Berks County!

Your Tournament Fee of $100 per person includes a round of golf with cart, lunch, snacks, beverages, dinner and dessert. There will be prizes awarded for winning foursomes in each of three flights and other awards given at the closing dinner. Entry is limited to the first 100 golfers. Enter early to reserve your spot! Tournament is limited to the first 100 golfers.

Ready to Golf? Get your registration form now.

Would you like to be a sponsor? Get the sponsorship form.

Want a printable flyer?Download the flyer.

Want more info? Please call 610-375-8407.

The Tournament starts out with Registration and Lunch at noon followed by a Shotgun Start at 1 p.m. with Dinner and Awards following.

Sponsorship opportunities are available. Call 610-375-8407 to find out more information.

 

Your generosity helps fuel the continued efforts of  VRC to provide services, programs and education opportunities for those in need. For more information of services and how you can continue to make a difference, please view The White Cane Fund HERE.

 

 

April is National Sports Eye Safety Month

April is National Sports Eye Safety Month

from Eye Health in Sports and Recreation written by David Turbert, reviewed by Brenda Pagan-Duran MD – American Academy of Ophthalmology

Tens of thousands of sports and recreation-related eye injuries occur each year. The good news is that 90 percent of serious eye injuries are preventable through use of appropriate protective eyewear.

The risk of eye injury can vary depending on the activity. Make sure the level of eye protection you or others in your family use is appropriate for the type of activity. Regular eyeglasses do not offer proper eye protection.

 

High-Risk Sports

For all age groups, sports-related eye injuries occur most frequently in baseball, basketball and racquet sports.

Boxing and full-contact martial arts pose an extremely high risk of serious and even blinding eye injuries. There is no satisfactory eye protection for boxing, although thumbless gloves may reduce the number of boxing eye injuries.

In baseball, ice hockey and men’s lacrosse, a helmet with a polycarbonate (an especially strong, shatterproof, lightweight plastic) face mask or wire shield should be worn at all times. It is important that hockey face masks be approved by the Hockey Equipment Certification Council or the Canadian Standards Association (CSA).

Protective eyewear with polycarbonate lenses should be worn for sports such as basketball, racquet sports, soccer and field hockey. Choose eye protectors that have been tested to meet the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards or that pass the CSA racquet sports standard. See the EyeSmart Protective Eyewear page for additional details.

If you already have reduced vision in one eye, consider the risks of injuring the stronger eye before participating in contact or racquet sports, which pose a higher risk of eye injury. Check with your ophthalmologist (Eye M.D.) to see if appropriate eye protection is available and whether or not participating in contact or racquet sports is advised.

 

Other Risky Leisure Activities

While sports account for a particularly high number of eye injuries, they are by no means the only hobby that poses a risk to your sight. According to physicians surveyed for the 2008 Eye Injury Snapshot conducted by the American Academy of Ophthalmology and the American Society of Ocular Trauma, more than 40 percent of patients treated for eye injuries sustained at home were involved in home repairs, yard work, cleaning and cooking. Use common sense and err on the side of caution, whatever the activity.

  • Consider the risk of flying debris or other objects during activities and wear appropriate eye protection.
  • Remember that eyeglasses aren’t sufficient protection.
  • Be careful during activities or games involving projectiles and other sharp objects that could create injury if in contact with the eye. For example, the U.S. Eye Injury Registry indicates that fishing is the number one cause of sports-related eye injuries.
  • If you wear contacts or eyeglasses, pack a back-up form of vision correction during bike trips or other activities where you could lose or shatter a lens.

If an eye injury occurs, see an ophthalmologist or go to the emergency room immediately, even if the eye injury appears minor. Delaying medical attention can result in permanent vision loss or blindness.

 

Learn What to Do For an Eye Injury

If you or your child get an eye injury, follow these important care and treatment guidelines for eye injuries.

 

On-the-Field Visual Test Helps Diagnose Concussions in Athletes

About 3.8 million Americans sustain sports-related concussions each year, so a quick, reliable screening test would be useful on the sidelines, to keep injured athletes from returning to play too soon, and off the field to help physicians more effectively diagnose, treat and rehabilitate patients with concussions. An on-the-field visual test can help.

 

For more information, please talk with your eye professional.

Read the full AAO article here

Vision and Hearing Expo

DUE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, VISION AND HEARING EXPO 2020 HAS BEEN CANCELLED


Thursday, April 30, 2020
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Crowne Plaza, Reading

 

brought to you by our Event Sponsor, Wells Fargo, NA

 

 

 

 

featuring live radio coverage by Mike Faust with WEEU’s Feedback Talk Show, sponsored by Berks Optometric Society

and educational topics and seminars underwritten by Berks ENT

 

Join us on Thursday, April 30, 2020 at Crowne Plaza Reading for Vision and Hearing Expo, Berks County’s one stop vision and hearing event. Vision and Hearing Expo is Berks County’s premier experience for brand new and exciting vision and hearing focused trends and technologies. Throughout the day, educational seminars and hands-on demonstrations related to low vision management, hearing loss, caregiver understanding and more will be offered. Vision and Hearing Expo is for you, your family members, friends, caregivers and anyone who wants insight regarding hearing and vision services, technologies and education related to all aspects of hearing and vision.

Admission and parking are all free. Don’t miss out on this opportunity of the year!

 

Vision and Hearing Professionals and Product Vendors, there are limited spots still available!

Are you interested in meeting potential clients face-to-face? We have some great spaces still available! This is a wonderful opportunity to share your products, practice, innovations and knowledge base with the Berks County (and beyond) Vision and Hearing related communities. Download the Booth and Sponsorship form HERE and contact Carolyn Krick at ckrick@vrcberks.org for additional information and reservations. Hurry, spots are limited! If you know a business or medical practice that would be interested in sharing their services and products, you can download and share the printable General Info flyer HERE.

 

Coronavirus Information

Important Message

In light of the recent events regarding the outbreak of Coronavirus (COVID-19), Vision Resource Center remains unwavering in its dedication to our Berks County communities. Please note we will be experiencing situations that may result in the rescheduling and/or cancellation of VRC activities and events. For up-to-date information related to Vision Resource Center schedules and events, please call 610-375-8407 or visit us on Facebook.

We encourage everyone to be educated regarding facts and information that are currently known. The Center for Disease Control provides the latest information on Coronavirus, including steps to prevent illness, what to do if you’re sick, and ways to keep your surroundings safe. Call your doctor or health professional immediately if you think you have been exposed to COVID-19. Visit https://www.cdc.gov/ for more information.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in people and many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. The complete clinical picture with regard to COVID-19 is not fully known. Reported illnesses have ranged from very mild (including some with no reported symptoms) to severe, including illness resulting in death. While information so far suggests that most COVID-19 illness is mild, a reportexternal icon out of China suggests serious illness occurs in 16% of cases. Older people and people of all ages with severe chronic medical conditions — like heart disease, lung disease and diabetes, for example — seem to be at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness. CDC has developed guidance to help in the risk assessment and management of people with potential exposures to COVID-19.

  • Everyone can do their part to help us respond to this emerging public health threat:
    • Individuals and communities should familiarize themselves with recommendations to protect themselves and their communities from getting and spreading respiratory illnesses like COVID-19.
    • Older people and people with severe chronic conditions should take special precautions because they are at higher risk of developing serious COVID-19 illness.
    • If you are a healthcare provider, use your judgment to determine if a patient has signs and symptoms compatible with COVID-19 and whether the patient should be tested. Factors to consider in addition to clinical symptoms may include:
      • Does the patient have recent travel from an affected area?
      • Has the patient been in close contact with someone with COVID-19 or with patients with pneumonia of unknown cause?
      • Does the patient reside in an area where there has been community spread of COVID-19?
    • If you are a healthcare provider or a public health responder caring for a COVID-19 patient, please take care of yourself and follow recommended infection control procedures.
    • If you are a close contact of someone with COVID-19 and develop symptoms of COVID-19, call your healthcare provider and tell them about your symptoms and your exposure. They will decide whether you need to be tested, but keep in mind that there is no treatment for COVID-19 and people who are mildly ill are able to isolate at home.
    • If you are a resident in a community where there is ongoing spread of COVID-19 and you develop COVID-19 symptoms, call your healthcare provider and tell them about your symptoms. They will decide whether you need to be tested, but keep in mind that there is no treatment for COVID-19 and people who are mildly ill are able to isolate at home.
  • For people who are ill with COVID-19, but are not sick enough to be hospitalized, please follow CDC guidance on how to reduce the risk of spreading your illness to others. People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness.
  • If you have been in China or another affected area or have been exposed to someone sick with COVID-19 in the last 14 days, you will face some limitations on your movement and activityPlease follow instructions during this time. Your cooperation is integral to the ongoing public health response to try to slow spread of this virus.

 

For additional information, please visit the following sites:

Centers for Disease Control: https://www.cdc.gov/

World Health Organization: https://www.who.int/

Pennsylvania Department of Health: https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx

 

 

 

Insight on BCTV: Pennsylvania Braille Challenge

Mark Levengood discusses the first Pennsylvania Braille Challenge with Anna Ackley, Pennsylvania Regional Braille Challenge Coordinator. Watch March 2020’s BCTV’s Insight here…

View on BCTV.org

 

 

March is National Save Your Vision Month

National Save Your Vision Month

March is National Save Your Vision Month

Digital technology not only redefines how people interact with the world, but also how they see it, making it all the more important for the public to make smart eye care choices.

credit: American Optometric Association

That’s why the ’21st-century Eye’ is the focus of AOA’s Save Your Vision Month public awareness campaign throughout March, offering consumers a healthy reminder about eye health from the most authoritative source they know—their eye doctors.

Take advantage of Save Your Vision Month resources—such as promotional kits from Optometry Cares®—The AOA Foundation—to get your message heard.

3 considerations for the 21st-century eye

Below are three messages bound to resonate with an increasingly tech-conscious public that this year’s Save Your Vision Month campaign will reinforce:

  1. Give your eyes a break. An AOA survey found that 83 percent of children between the ages of 10 and 17 use an electronic device for more than three hours a day, while only 14 percent reported taking a visual break every 20 minutes. The AOA recommends the 20-20-20 rule to ward off digital eye strain: Take a 20-second break to view something 20 feet away every 20 minutes. And when it comes to digital devices, research indicates that blue light exposure could be doing some harm.
  2. Be a savvy shopper. Purchasing eyeglasses online may seem like a consumer convenience, but the AOA warns that the consequences of making an incorrect or uninformed purchase could cost patients more time and money in the long run. An AOA study published in 2011 with the Optical Laboratories Association and The Vision Council found nearly half of all glasses ordered online had either prescription errors or failed to meet minimum safety standards.
  3. Skip shortcuts. When it comes to the overall health and wellbeing of eyes, there is no substitute for a yearly, comprehensive eye exam by an eye doctor. Mobile apps or online tests do not provide the appropriate accuracy or information when it comes to changes in eye and general health. Regular, comprehensive eye exams are one of the most important, preventive ways to preserve healthy eyes and save vision.

Jack Schaeffer, O.D., Optometry Cares board member, says the observance is a great chance to join a worthwhile national awareness campaign that benefits optometry.

“This is an opportunity to really educate as many people as we can, to start that word of mouth of, ‘hey, let’s take care of our eyes,'” Dr. Schaeffer says in an upcoming article about the campaign in the March edition of AOA Focus.

 

For more information, please talk with your eye professional.

Read the full AOA article

Beeping Egg Hunt Event

Please join Vision Resource Center of Berks County for a Beeping Egg Hunt, Easter Crafts, and Goodies!

When:  Saturday, April 4th from 1PM-3PM

Where:  VRC Headquarters 2020 Hampden Blvd., Reading, PA 19604

Siblings and family members welcome!

 

Please RSVP by Wednesday, March 18th to Lori at 610-375-8407 ext. 112 if you are able to attend, and the ages of those attending.

*All attendees must pre-register!

THANK YOU!!

Insight on BCTV: Milestone Anniversaries with Visual Impairment

Mark Levengood talks about milestone anniversaries with a visual impairment with Sherm and Gloria Barto, who recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary. Sherm is a VRC client and board member and his wife is sighted. Watch February 2020’s BCTV’s Insight here…

View on BCTV.org