Dine in the Dark


Vision Resource Center of Berks County and the Kutztown University Visual Impairment Program proudly present

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Crowne Plaza, Reading
1741 Papermill Road
Reading, PA 19610

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>>> For Corporate and Individual Sponsorship Opportunities, Please Click HERE. <<<


You are cordially invited to the most enlightening dinner event of 2018. 

This one-of-a-kind evening promises powerful messages from clients, caregivers, and community leaders personally touched by visual impairment and we’d love YOU to be there with us.

Whether from personal experience, a family member, friend, or acquaintance, practically everyone is touched by the reality of blindness or low vision. Realizing the ongoing need for blind and low vision awareness within our community, Vision Resource Center of Berks County along with the Kutztown University Visual Impairment Program proudly present Dine in the Dark taking place on Thursday, September 27th, 2018 at the Crowne Plaza Reading. Cocktail hour will begin at 5PM with dinner being served while you are blindfolded at 6PM. Your support allows Vision Resource Center of Berks County and the Kutztown University Visual Impairment Program the continued opportunity to help blind and visually impaired children and adults in our community. Don’t miss this unique night!

For tickets or more information about Dine in the Dark, please call 610-375-8407. You can also purchase your tickets HERE.

 

Interested in partnering with us for Dine in the Dark 2018? We have sponsorship opportunities available including the coveted Title Sponsorship. For more information, please visit our Sponsorship Opportunities page HERE. If you would like to speak with someone directly, please contact Carolyn Krick: 610-375-8407 ext. 110 (ckrick@vrcberks.org) or Bill Sutton: 610-375-8407 ext. 117 (bsutton@vrcberks.org).

 


Dine in the Dark 2017… A Night To Remember

In our continued effort to raise awareness for the blind and low vision of our community, Vision Resource Center of Berks County along with Kutztown University Program on Visual Impairments hosted our annual Dine in the Dark event on Thursday, September 28th, 2017.

In 2017 Dine in the Dark turned into a bigger and wider reaching event by moving from the VRC building to the Crowne Plaza of Reading. Cocktail hour opened the evening with a chance for people to mingle and bid on raffle items. At 6 p.m., the blindfolds went on and dinner was served! After dinner, the visual struggles continued when the blindfolds came off and glasses that simulate a variety of eye ailments were worm at the self-serve dessert stations! Over 150 people experienced a one-of-a-kind evening of education and inspiration with firsthand accounts from clients, staff, and friends of Vision Resource Center of Berks County and Kutztown University. It was truly an evening of light being shed in the dark. Many in attendance raved about the food, the presentations, and a humbling appreciation for sight and those who struggle daily with low vision.

Your support allows Vision Resource Center of Berks County and the Kutztown University Visual Impairment Program the continued opportunity to help blind and visually impaired children and adults in our community. VRC and KU send out a big THANK YOU to all our event sponsors and attendees!

 

If you or your organization can’t make the evening but would still like to donate, please click on a link below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

Story Credit: Consumer Health Digest

August is dedicated to preventing eye injuries and vision loss and saving children’s eyesight. One of 20 children ages 3 to 5 has a vision problem that could result in permanent vision if left untreated. Despite this unsettling statistics, 80 percent of preschoolers do not receive an eye screening. Children’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month encourages parents to learn how to protect their child’s eyesight and save their child’s eyesight from vision threatening conditions through regular eye exams, hence early detection and proper treatment. According to Craig Hensle, MD, President of the Virginia Society of Ophthalmology, eye exams for children are important because vision changes can occur without you or your child noticing.

 

Purpose of Children’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month

Parents should make their child’s vision health a priority, which is why the main objectives of Children’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month are to:

  • Spread Information On The Importance Of Healthy Vision – Many activities gear towards family-friendly resources that help parents take care of their child’s eye sight and keep it healthy.
  • Know More About Early Detection Of Vision Problems In Children – Impart the red flags that a child may have a vision problem, such as uneven focus, amblyopia (lazy eye) and strabismus (crossed eyes). Early detection of vision conditions is crucial. Lazy eye is often corrected if treatment started at an early age; however, successful treatment is rarely achieved if treatment has started after a child reaches 8 or 9 years old.
  • Raise Awareness About Preventing Eye Injuries In Children – In addition to eye diseases and conditions, you can also protect your children from sports-related eye injuries. About 100,000 sports-related eye injuries happen every day, where in one-third of these injuries occur in children under age 16. 90% could have been avoided if the child had worn protective eyewear, such as polycarbonate lenses fitted by an eye care professional. These lenses can withstand a ball traveling 90mph as it is 20 times stronger than ordinary eyeglasses.
  • Save Children’s Eyesight – Teach parents to help their child correct their vision and recover from vision loss.

 

What You can do on Children’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month?

Having a month dedicated to knowing about your child’s eye health and safety can make a big difference to your child’s health and life. Based on the key objectives of this awareness month, you can do so much more to help raise awareness about vision diseases and eye conditions in children, as well as how to prevent them. To do a quick involvement, you can do your own research online and use the social media to share good and factual information to others. You can also support eye health and safety education program and sight-saving programs, which are designed specifically for children.

 

Message on Children’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month

Children Eye Health

Children should have an eye exam at 6 months and this must be repeated at age 3. Once they start school, eye exams must be done regularly. About 80% of what children learn in school is taught visually, which means if a child has undetected and uncorrected vision problem, it will affect the child’s development and performances in school. Some warning signs that your child may be experiences vision problems are:

  • Tilting the head or squinting to see the class board better or when watching TV
  • Frequent eye rubbing when he’s trying to concentrate on something.
  • Holding a book too close to his eyes or often sitting close to the TV.
  • Consistently using his fingers to guide his eyes when reading.
  • Closing one eye to read or watch TV.
  • Excessive tearing without any tear-causing stimuli.
  • Eye discomfort when using a computer or any digital device i.e digital eye strain.
  • Sensitivity to light, which sometimes accompanied by headache or nausea.
  • Wandering eyes.

 

Special Tips on Children’s Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month

Aside from keeping a watchful eye for some of the warning signs listed above, protect your child from eye injuries by ensuring your children’s toys are age-appropriate and not a danger to their eyes. Check if your child’s toys or stuff are free of sharp or protruding parts that could accidentally poke the eyes. Fireworks are also detrimental to your child’s safety, as it can cause blindness if not handled correctly.

 

Conclusion

It’s your responsibility as a parent to know how you can keep your child’s vision healthy and obtain early diagnosis in case your child is suffering from vision problems through a regular eye exam. Also, be aware that eye injuries can happen anytime, anywhere. Eye injuries are often caused by sports or physical activities, so know proper precautions such as wearing protective eyewear when playing sports.

 


About Consumer Health Digest: Consumer Health Digest presents health related content to individuals looking to improve their overall health and well-being. All of the content appearing on Consumer Health Digest’s website is produced, selected, and reviewed by health writers and editors. Consumer Health Digest focuses on providing valuable health information and savings on health-related products for better managing your health.

 

Fireworks Eye Safety Advice from AAO

Fireworks Eye Safety Advice from AAO

Story Credit: American Academy of Opthalmology, Written by Shirley Dang / Reviewed by Brenda Pagan-Duran MD

Fireworks may be advertised like toys. You may think you know how to handle them safely. But fireworks injure thousands of Americans every year. Playing with fireworks can blind you or your loved ones. Leave fireworks to the professionals this year.


Thousands of people, many of them children, suffer eye injuries from fireworks each year in the United States. In the most severe cases, fireworks can rupture the globe of the eye, cause chemical and thermal burns, corneal abrasions and retinal detachment — all of which can permanently cause eye damage and affect vision.

According to the most recent fireworks injury report (PDF) from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, fireworks injuries in the in the United States caused nearly 10,500 injuries requiring treatment in emergency rooms. The report also showed that nearly 1,300 eye injuries related to fireworks were treated in U.S. emergency rooms in 2014, more than double the 600 reported in 2012.

Those injured by fireworks are not necessarily handling the explosives themselves. In fact, nearly half of people injured by fireworks are bystanders, according to an international study (PDF). Children are frequent victims: 35 percent who sustained a fireworks injury are age 15 and under, according to the commission’s report.

Fireworks: The Blinding Truth

Fireworks safety tips

The Academy advises that the best way to avoid a potentially blinding fireworks injury is by attending a professional public fireworks show rather than purchasing fireworks for home use.

For those who attend professional fireworks displays and/or live in communities surrounding the shows:

  • Respect safety barriers at fireworks shows and view fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Do not touch unexploded fireworks; instead, immediately contact local fire or police departments to help.

For those who decide to purchase consumer fireworks because they live in states where they are legal, the Academy recommends the following safety tips to prevent eye injuries:

  • Never let young children play with fireworks of any type, even sparklers.
  • People who handle fireworks should always wear protective eyewear that meets the parameters set by the American National Standards Institute and ensure that all bystanders are also wearing eye protection.
  • Leave the lighting of professional-grade fireworks to trained pyrotechnicians.

What to do for a fireworks eye injury

If an eye injury from fireworks occurs, remember:

  • Seek medical attention immediately.
  • Do not rub your eyes.
  • Do not rinse your eyes.
  • Do not apply pressure.
  • Do not remove any objects that are stuck in the eye.
  • Do not apply ointments or take any blood-thinning pain medications such as aspirin or ibuprofen.

 


About the American Academy of Ophthalmology: The mission of the American Academy of Ophthalmology is to protect sight and empower lives by serving as an advocate for patients and the public, leading ophthalmic education, and advancing the profession of ophthalmology. The American Academy of Ophthalmology is the world’s largest association of eye physicians and surgeons. A global community of 32,000 medical doctors, we protect sight and empower lives by setting the standards for ophthalmic education and advocating for our patients and the public. We innovate to advance our profession and to ensure the delivery of the highest-quality eye care.

 

June is Cataract Awareness Month

June is Cataract Awareness Month

Story Credit: Prevent Blindness America

Vision Loss from Leading Cause of Blindness Can be Restored with Proper Treatment

There are currently more than 24 million Americans age 40 and older who have cataract, according to the Vision Problems in the U.S. report from Prevent Blindness America.  It is the leading cause of blindness worldwide.

Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens which blocks or changes the passage of light into the eye.  Unlike many eye diseases, however, vision loss due to cataract can be restored.  Cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed procedures in the United States and has a 95 percent success rate. And, a new study found that cataract surgery patients had a significantly reduced rate of hip fractures from falls.

To educate the public on cataract, Prevent Blindness America has declared June as Cataract Awareness Month.  The national non-profit group provides free information through its dedicated web page at preventblindness.org/cataract, or via phone at (800) 331-2020.  For those interested in conducting discussions or seminars on the subject, PBA offers a free online module on cataract including a PowerPoint presentation with a complete guide as part of its Healthy Eyes Educational Series

Cataract generally does not cause pain, redness or tears. However, these changes in your vision may be signs of cataract:

  • Blurred vision, double vision, ghost images, the sense of a “film” over the eyes.
  • Lights seem too dim for reading or close-up work, or you are “dazzled” by strong light.
  •  Changing eyeglass prescriptions often. The change may not seem to help your vision.
  • You may sometimes notice the cataract in your eye. It may look like a milky or yellowish spot in the pupil (the center of your eye is normally black).

“Although getting a cataract is common, it doesn’t have to mean permanent vision loss,” said Hugh R. Parry, president and CEO of Prevent Blindness America.   “One way to protect our vision is to make a commitment to take care of our eyes today, including getting a dilated eye exam, so we can help protect our sight for the future not just from cataract, but other eye diseases as well.”

For free information on cataract including Medicare coverage, please call Prevent Blindness America at (800) 331-2020 or log on to preventblindness.org/cataract.

 


About Prevent Blindness America: Founded in 1908, Prevent Blindness America is the nation’s leading volunteer eye health and safety organization dedicated to fighting blindness and saving sight. Focused on promoting a continuum of vision care, Prevent Blindness America touches the lives of millions of people each year through public and professional education, advocacy, certified vision screening and training, community and patientservice programs and research. These services are made possible through the generous support of the American public. Together with a network of affiliates and regional offices, Prevent Blindness America is committed to eliminating preventable blindness in America.

 

Dine in the Dark Sponsorship Opportunities


Vision Resource Center of Berks County and the Kutztown University Visual Impairment Program proudly present

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Crowne Plaza, Reading
1741 Papermill Road
Reading, PA 19610


Help Vision Resource Center of Berks County and the Kutztown University Visual Impairment Program make a difference in our community by partnering with us for Dine in the Dark 2017.

Imagine waking up one morning and your world was dark, fuzzy, or cloudy. What if you could no longer drive to work, the grocery store, or to your child’s after school functions because of vision loss. How would you cope? How would your family cope? The Vision Resource Center of Berks County has created the Dine in the Dark event for people with vision to experience a meal in darkness.

Dine in the Dark will take place on Thursday, September 27, 2018 at the Crowne Plaza Reading, 1741 Papermill Road, Reading, Pennsylvania 19610. Educational activities and demonstrations will begin at 5PM and dinner will be served while you are blindfolded at 6PM.

Vision Resource Center of Berks County, in partnership with the Kutztown University Visual Impairment Program, will present this enlightening opportunity for you to experience an evening without sight and then listen to powerful messages from clients, caregivers, and community members about their stories and experiences.

This year, we are proud to announce that Ted and Lisa Lavender of Berks Fire Water Restorations are the co-chairs of this event. Please download and review the Sponsorship Opportunities Form HERE and consider becoming a sponsor for this event to show your support for those within our local community living with vision loss. Individual Dine in the Dark tickets and program ads are also available. Your support will allow Vision Resource Center of Berks County and Kutztown University’s Department of Teachers of the Visually Impaired to continue their work with blind and visually impaired children and adults.

Thank you in advance for your support of this worthy cause. For additional information about Dine in the Dark sponsorship opportunities, please contact Carolyn Krick at 610-375-8407 ext. 110 (ckrick@vrcberks.org) or Bill Sutton at 610-375-8407 ext. 117 (bsutton@vrcberks.org). If you wish to sponsor via credit card, please click any of the options below for secure PayPal options.

If payment is made by credit card, please download the Dine in the Dark Sponsorship Opportunities Form HERE, fill it out, and return it to us via fax (610-375-6467), email, or mail (2020 Hampden Blvd., Reading, PA 19604).


Platinum/Title Sponsor* only one available – $5,000
to pay by credit card, CLICK HERE

Gold Sponsor* – $2,500
to pay by credit card, CLICK HERE

Silver Sponsor* – $1,500
to pay by credit card, CLICK HERE

Bronze Sponsor* – $500
to pay by credit card, CLICK HERE

Full Page Program Ad* – $400
to pay by credit card, CLICK HERE

Half Page Program Ad* – $250
to pay by credit card, CLICK HERE

Patron Sponsor* – $250
to pay by credit card, CLICK HERE

 

*Your contribution is tax deductible to the extent allowed by law.